Mateys! The Sea of Cortez Calls To You

 

Sea of Cortez Map1

Mateys! Your presence has been requested in the Sea of Cortez! The captain be lookin’ fer crew fer the old sailing vessel Hokahey. All sailing levels are welcome aboard for this trip of a lifetime, where we will learn life skills, study biology, and find adventure.

In March we be castin’ off the lines where Hokahey be birthed in La Paz, and you’ll be mannin’ the sails as she cruises through the famous waters that renown marine biologist Jacque Cousteau dubbed “the World’s Aquarium.” Prepare yerselves for gray whales moving through the water alongside us, sea turtles lifting their heads to sip the soft air, sailfish making clean breaches in the distance, sea lions playing tug-o-war with kelp, and as always, dolphins, keeping sharks at bay and surfing our bow wake. Prepare yerselves to see uninhabited islands sitting in water that is brimming with life!

Crew members:
All levels welcome, including first-time sailors. Crew members aboard Hokahey will learn to sail, navigate, plan voyages, and identify and study the marine biology we encounter in the Sea of Cortez. The Sea of Cortez is nicknamed “The World’s” Aquarium” and will not disappoint. It is a prime location to study grey whales, giant game fish such as marlin and dorado, sea lions, sea turtles, whale sharks, and hundreds of other types of marine species. At times even orcas make an appearance in this body of water!

Location:
Mexico- La Paz, cruising in the Sea of Cortez, and anchoring in her coves and off of her islands.

Dates:
Arrival- March 25, 2018
Departure- April 1, 2018

Logistics:
Fly into Cabo San Lucas and take a shuttle to La Paz OR fly directly into La Paz and take a car to where Hokahey is birthed.

Donation:
You get yourself to and from Hokahey in La Paz, and also donate $333 to the Jackson Hole Sailing Team to support youth voyages so even the landlocked can learn the ways of sailing, navigating, and the ocean’s mysterious temperaments.
If you are dealing with economic challenges, let us know- We have a sliding scale!

Further questions mateys? Email the captain: captaingeorgebailey@gmail.com

See you all in the Sea of Cortez, ye landlubbers! The ocean be callin’ ya!

Sea of Cortez image

Enter “The World’s Aquarium”

Hola sailors and sailor-wanna-bees,

Jackson Hole Ocean Sailing Team is sailing from Marina del Rey to La Paz Mexico on December 23. We will cruise down during the peak of Grey Whale migration and arrive in the beautiful port of La Paz on or before January 2.  Want to join us?

catalina-race-moving-slideGood opportunity to learn about sailing, sea life, science technology engineering and math. No experience necessary, just have the spirit of adventure and embrace ocean life.

 

The JH Ocean Sailing Team will have the boat in La Paz January-March 2018. Here  are the opportunities for adventure and learning in what Jacque Cousteau called “the world’s aquarium”…the Sea of Cortez.

Trip 1: January 25, 26, 27

Trip 2: February 10-19

Trip 3: March 29,30,31

We will sail to Los Islotes and swim with sea lions, watch the manta rays jump and look for whale sharks. All while sailing in the 53 foot long ocean racing sailboat with a carbon mast! Contact captaingeorgebailey@gmail.com

Here’s lookin at you, kid

Epic adventure ahead, mateys! Looking for adults and kids to join a life changing race to MEXICO. $750 gets you a dry land training session in JH April 23, sailing practice April 26-27, then the race to Mexico and the sail home. Interested? Email captaingeorgebailey@gmail.com

Jh Ocean Sailing Poster copy

“Old Bill” ready to match donations!

We’ve had a great 12 months helping kids develop life skills through sailing. We’ve conducted two sold out/waiting list summer lake sailing sessions through Parks & Rec. We’ve run land based sessions for many kids (and some adults) in Jackson Hole. And we’ve had an orientation session that featured local sailing legend Travis Rice (also a master at snowboarding). The Jackson Hole Ocean Sailing Team raced to Hawaii last July and has done a series of other ocean races including the super fun Newport to Ensenada Mexico Race.  Learning sailing skills is a big part of the program but teaching kids about leadership, teamwork, competitiveness and STEM is just as important. Quite a few parents and local adult sailors have also participated.

We need your help to offer more kids these unique learning adventures, and if you donate unspecifiedthrough Old Bill’s Fun Run in the next 15 days, Old Bill will match part of your donation! Click: oldbills.org

YOU IN?: 2015-16 Summary and Long Point Race

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The past year has been a momentous one for the Jackson Hole Ocean Sailing Team. After a dramatic campaign to compete in the 2015 Transpac Race from Los Angeles to Honolulu, we’ve been building our training program on Jackson Lake, combined with a variety of training sails and races on the coastal Pacific areas of Marina Del Rey, Orange County and coastal Mexico.

We successfully competed in the TransPac race with a crew of 12, including 18 year old Jackson resident Conner Field as a foredeck master who, with a combination of smarts and athleticism, demonstrated he could race on any boat on the West Coast.

We held a variety of meetings in Jackson to introduce the community to JHOST and the thrill of sailing, including a session with Travis Rice, who regaled attendees with his passion for sailing and racing. We hope to have Travis join us on a race in the Pacific soon.

We have held a series of dry land in Jackson, and on the water training aboard Hokahey in Los Angeles. We had 5 new trainees aboard for a sail training session for a trip from Los Angeles to Catalina and back to LA. That was followed by the Newport to Ensenada Race. We had a mixed crew of adult sailors of varying levels of experience, and 5 youth trainees.

It was the fastest Newport to Ensenada race in recent memory and our trainees had a remarkable ride.

This summer introduced the Lake training program, a joint effort between JHOST and the Teton County Rec Center on Jackson Lake. Heavy winds and sunshine combined to provide a challenging and invigorating sailing experience over two weeks.

Our next ocean race is the Long Point Race series, departing from Newport Beach August 25, with a race to Catalina Island followed by a course race around the Channel Islands and returning to Catalina on August 26 and a race back to Newport on the 27th. There will be a variety of social functions on Catalina during the weekend, allowing participants to meet and talk with other sailors.
Those interested in participating in either the Lake training program or the Long Point program are encouraged to contact us at captaingeorgebailey@gmail.com.

N2E Day 4: Speedy Delivery Sunday

After a night sailing north under a supermoon the color of a clementine orange peel, we pulled into our slip in Marina del Rey. We checked the standings and saw that this year’s N2E Race had been fast for everyone—two records had even been broken. As for us, we finished in the top third, but we were time corrected to the bottom because Hokahey is a super speedy racing boat. The Youth Team sailors are currently laughing as they spray down the deck (and each other). They’ve worked as tirelessly as any adult crew. Time to plan the next race, right, mateys?

We always need more kids looking for adventure, so sign up for the team and let’s go sailing!

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N2E Day 3: The Finish Saturday

IMG_5743At 05:30 hours, we spotted the finish line in Ensenada, marked by a buoy marker and a small committee power boat floating serenely in the distance. And sailing about a quarter mile in front of us was a 40-foot sloop. She was moving steadily toward the finish, moments, it seemed, from crossing.

Our 14-year-old driver tightened his grip on the helm and raced after her. “Jibe!” he called to his crew, swiftly turning the wheel to move Hokahey’s stern through the eye of the wind and toward the finish. Scrambling across the cockpit, our whippersnappers eased and pulled the sheets. A winch cracked loudly. The palmtrees lining the Ensenada coast sped backwards as we began barrelling through the waves toward our competitor. Hokahey charged through the finish line at what appeared to be the exact same moment as our rival. We held our breath and waited for the two race officials sitting in the committee boat to make their call, watching them shine a light first on our competitor’s sail, and then on our sail. “Sail number US51200” the loudspeaker announced. It was ours!

We looked back mid-victory dance at the boat we’d mercilessly taken down. It turned out to be crewed by one man holding a cup of coffee and a little dog in his lap. He waved. His dog, who appeared to be a chihuahua, wagged her tail.

We circled the Ensenada marina, spoke Spanish to a few people in boats, and the headed north to San Diego. Hokahey has to drop off one of our adult crew members so he can fly back to Jackson.